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12 May 2009 @ 05:31 pm
how did he learn how to do that?  

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A Sage With a Slight Flaw in Her Charactereccentrific on May 12th, 2009 09:52 pm (UTC)
I will theorize the same way that gymnasts learn all their big, dagnerous flippy moves. Which is they have a belt with ropes attached on either side which go through pulleys on the ceiling and have two people whose job it is to haul on the ropes if they are in danger of landing on their head.

That's pretty cool.
Nurghringrose on May 12th, 2009 10:00 pm (UTC)
Neat. I'd guess he started by doing it on a mat, and failing a couple times. Once you get to where you are doing most of the flip, the failure modes are landing on your hands and knees, or on your rear.


Any chance of putting video behind a cut? When I read LJ from work it's on a machine which is remote controlled. On a bad day, video over that connection has unfortunate performance consequences. On a good day, it's simply distracting.
Someone I am is waiting for my courageforgotten_aria on May 13th, 2009 03:06 am (UTC)
yup, sorry, I'll do that now.
chenoamegchenoameg on May 13th, 2009 03:38 am (UTC)
Thanks! I do like the video, but I get strangely hypnotised by video on my friend's page.
Fashionable, but unable to tell fact from fictiontesting4l on May 12th, 2009 11:31 pm (UTC)
That is...hypnotic.

What interests me are the number of factors -- the elasticity of the ball, the velocity at which it's rolled, his mass on that day...

I wonder how fast he'd have to roll the ball to flip 2x.
Shooting for the moonintuition_ist on May 13th, 2009 02:13 am (UTC)
looks like a really good way to fall on your head, if you happen to get the timing wrong...
Binkbinkbink on May 13th, 2009 04:42 am (UTC)
I am thinking that the first time may have been an accident. He was showing off, tried to land on it, had an uh oh moment, pushed up (down) with his head and was surprised he landed on his feet.

Then the ropes, belt, helmet, and mats to turn it into something he could repeat.

And yes, the physics here is fascinating. Especially the amount the ball compresses, the exact speeds needed, and the exact moment of launch required.